From

To

LIVE Commodity Data
print view |  email to friend

eNews from Friday, June 5, 2009

Sunflower Oil May Be Useful in Decontaminating Groundwater, Industrial Waste

Gulf News (United Arab Emirates) -- June 5, 2009 -- Sunflower oil has been tested positively at the UAE University for being an effective and environment-friendly way for removing Chromium Hexavalent or Cr(VI) contamination from ground water sources and industrial waste.

The breakthrough suggests sunflower as an alternate to kerosene oil, a hazardous and toxic solvent, which is currently being used for Cr(VI) contamination removal from the industrial effluents including the refinery waste.

Researchers consider industrial waste as a major source of chromium contamination in the environment.

The Cr(VI) is a toxic form of chromium which is known to cause severe health problems in humans and animals resulting in skin rash, stomach ulcers, respiratory problems, weakening the immune system, kidney and liver damage and lungs cancer.

Dr Monwar Hussain, an Associate Professor at the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering in UAE University, who conducted the research, also used lubricating oil as an alternate solvent along with the sunflower oil. He, however, found sunflower oil more effective.

His research report said: "The initial studies have demonstrated the success of this process in removing Cr(VI) from aqueous [water based] solutions.

"With the new process, toxicity of the industrial effluents containing chromium and other metals can be reduced to a complete or partial removal from the source streams.

"The new solvent systems have several advantages including less toxicity, less corrosiveness, low environmental impact and good health and safety benefits," he said.

The researcher, however, said the results of the new solvent's application to an industrial sample were affected by the presence of other components.

"The removal of chromium decreased [as] compared to that obtained from [the] single component Cr(VI) solution," said Dr Hussain.

He said the main aim of the research was to show how other solvents with less toxicity and environmental impact can perform the extraction of the Cr(VI) in a similar degree as kerosene.

Chromium hexavalent (CrVI) compounds, often called hexavalent chromium, exist in several forms. Industrial uses of hexavalent chromium compounds include chromate pigments in dyes, paints, inks, and plastics; chromates added as anticorrosive agents to paints, primers, and other surface coatings; and chromic acid electroplated onto metal parts to provide a decorative or protective coating.

Hexavalent chromium can also be formed when performing "hot work" such as welding on stainless steel or melting chromium metal.

Occupational exposures occur mainly among workers who handle pigments containing dry chromate, spray paints and coatings containing chromate, operate chrome plating baths, and weld or cut metals containing chromium, such as stainless steel.

Workers who breathe hexavalent chromium compounds at their jobs for many years may be at increased risk of developing lung cancer.

Breathing high levels o hexavalent chromium can irritate or damage the nose, throat, and lungs. Irritation or damage to the eyes and skin can occur if hexavalent chromium contacts these organs in high concentrations or for a prolonged period of time.

Effects of compounds

Chromium Hexavalent or Cr(VI) compounds, often called hexavalent chromium, exist in several forms. Industrial uses of hexavalent chromium compounds include chromate pigments in dyes, paints, inks, and plastics; chromates added as anti-corrosive agents to paints, primers, and other surface coatings; and chromic acid electroplated onto metal parts to provide a decorative or protective coating.

Hexavalent chromium can also be formed when performing "hot work" such as welding on stainless steel or melting chromium metal.

Occupational exposures occur mainly among workers who handle pigments containing dry chromate, spray paints and coatings containing chromate, operate chrome plating baths, and weld or cut metals containing chromium, such as stainless steel.

Workers who breathe hexavalent chromium compounds for many years may be an increased risk of developing lung cancer.

Breathing high levels of hexavalent chromium can irritate or damage the nose, throat, and lungs. Irritation or damage to the eyes and skin can occur if hexavalent chromium comes in contact with these organs in high concentrations or for a prolonged period.

Source: US Department of Labour, Occupational Safety & Health Administration

(c) 2009 Al-Nisr Publishing LLC, Source: The Financial Times Limited

Copyright notice

This is a news service of NewsEdge Corporation ©2009. This content is for your personal use only, subject to Terms and Conditions. No redistribution allowed


Editor's Picks from Recent eNews

GCC Investors to Gain Strategic Knowledge of the Global Agriculture Sector at Global AgInvesting

2015 Dates Announced for European Debut of Oilseed Congress Europe/MENA and Women in Agribusiness Summit

Bayer CropScience to Share Insights on Unlocking New Canola Opportunities

USDA Announces Speakers for the 2014 Agricultural Outlook Forum

Monsanto and BASF Announce Progress in Annual Collaboration Pipeline Update

Features
Current Reports in the Resource Library at Soyatech.com

Soyfoods: The U.S. Market 2012
This annual report provides detailed information on the U.S. market by category, sub-category, brand and distribution channel.

Sponsored Links

Food Protein Hosts 34th Annual Vegetable Oil Extraction Short Course: November 9-13, 2014, Texas A&M University

Sustainable Food Supply, Processing & Products Measuring Sustainability Convincing New Consumers Oct. 14, 2014

Women in Agribusiness Study - A tool to help your company maximize the benefits of a diverse and inclusive workplace.

Live Commodity Prices on Soyatech.com

About Soyatech  |   Advertising Services  |   Privacy Policy  |   Legal Notices  |   Contact Soyatech  |   Site Map
Copyright © 2000-2014 Soyatech, LLC. • P.O. Box 1307 • Southwest Harbor, ME 04679 • USA